Soil Tests, Nitrogen and Compost

I had a recent soil test done on one section of my garden. I have had plants die in the past and recently the plants looked poorly in most of the area.

The test showed high levels of phosphorous, potassium and organic matter. The test does not test for nitrogen, but based upon my organic matter levels they didn’t recommend any added nitrogen. They did mention that, “Nitrogen is not listed because the level is not stable in the soil. It changes too frequently.”

What they recommended was to cut back on the compost, since my organic matter level is so high and to cut back on the phosphorous and potassium. He said that high levels can stop the uptake of other nutrients.

Their main recommendations were…

  1. Just use a high nitrogen fertilizer without added phosphorous or potassium – blood meal, cottonseed meal etc.
  2. Don’t add compost for a while. Try hardwood mulch on top

I did notice that added milorganite did green up the plants, but also adds phosphorous.

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Uthoff Valley Elementary

Uthoff Valley Elementary is the latest and nicest school garden I helped with this year. Here are a couple of notes about the garden.

  • The wood is treated so it should last longer than the wood we replaced.
  • The whole area is covered with mulch to keep down the weeds.
  • They added compost to the garden area and will add mulch after planting.
  • They asked about fertilizer and I suggested that if the plants looked poorly then they could add some Milorganite.
  • They are using a hose timer and soaker hose so that the entire area will be watered automatically over the summer.
  • The wood is placed on top of the soil. I suggested adding compost every year to build up the soil level.
  • The entire area had to be worked initially to remove the aggressive plants and weeds in the garden.

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Finding Seeds

I was recently asked where I found my seeds for the different plants I grow.

The best place to get seeds is your own garden. Save them in paper bags and label them.I like to let them dry on the plant and then put them in a paper bag. If you save your own seeds, then you don’t have to buy them.

The 2nd best place will be MY garden.I save lots of seeds every year in St. Louis. You are welcome to come over and get seeds in the fall.

The 3rd best place for seeds is Google. Do a search with the scientific name and you will find numerous seed resources. Many times I will visit the Missouri Botanical Garden and find a new plant I want to try. Take a picture of the plant and its name and then there’s a good chance you can find it online.

Another option are some of the Facebook online groups. Sometimes, many of the people are willing to share seeds for the price of a SASE.

Here’s a list of plants I have bought in the past and where I may have bought them. https://butterflygardening.wordpress.com/plants/

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Monarch from Egg to Butterfly

Six Weeks from Egg to Butterfly

June 2nd in St. Louis. as I was weeding the gardens, I found two newly emerged Monarchs. The first eggs I saw this year were around April 21st. Doing the math, it turns out that these Monarchs took six weeks to go from egg to Monarch butterfly. The extra long time period probably has to do with the cooler temperatures and extra spring rain.

If you are weeding in the garden, take some time and see if you can notice these newly emerged Monarchs.

This also emphasizes the importance of having early spring milkweed. My favorite is Ascelpias incarnata – Swamp Milkweed.

Note – June 6th – Monarch is flying around the garden. I’m not sure if it is MY monarch, but it’s nice to see.

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Fixing Soil with Amendments

Mycorrhizae
101010-Osmocote-Milo-Rosetone

This one particular garden area has been a problem for the last 3 or 4 years. Plants would dies for no particular reason, although some plants seem to not be bothered.

In the picture of poppies above, I have seeded much too heavily and the plants look terrible. I’m testing different type of amendments to see which might help the poppies.

Mycorrhizae is on the top and then left to right is is 10-10-10, Osmocote, Milorganite and Espoma Rosetone.

I added amendments on May 27th. Hopefully in a couple of weeks we will see what difference each of them makes.

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Drilling Holes for Plants

One of the easiest ways I have found to create holes for plants is to use a battery powered drill with an auger.

I have tried two sizes, a 1.75″ diameter with a short shaft and a 2.5″ diameter with a two foot shaft. The smaller shaft works well if you are sitting down, but does not leave a clean hole. You need to use one hand to clean it out before putting in the plant. The advantage is that the hole is smaller. The drill does have a tendency to get dirty as a result of having a shaft which is so short.

The 2.5″ diameter auger makes a clean hole, but the hole is larger. This is my favorite since it is easier to make a clean hole and easy to just throw in the plant and fill it in.

I have had good luck using an auger in good soil and bad. The auger will break up the soil into small pieces and will make it easy to fill in when the plant is in the hole.

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Monarch News

The Monarch eggs have hatched and it’s fun to watch the caterpillars chew up the Swamp Milkweed.

Below is a fun video on the Monarchs as they hibernate in Mexico.

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